How Do You Recover From Rape?

After being sexually assaulted, it can be difficult to know where to turn for help. Several studies suggest that group therapy is more effective at reducing PTSD, anxiety, and depression than individual therapy. However, group therapy may not be the best choice for everyone. Find out what other forms of therapy are available so you can decide what is right for you or a loved one. Continue reading

“Why Doesn’t She Just Leave?” Barriers to Getting Out of Abusive Relationships

Domestic violence is a fact of life in the U.S. for approximately 35% of women and 28% of men. When we learn someone is in an abusive relationship, the first question many people ask is “Well, why doesn’t she just leave?” However, getting out of the situation is not as easy as people like to think. Continue reading

Dating Violence: What Everyone Needs to Know

Think dating violence can’t happen to you? Dating violence usually starts with words, and it can happen to anyone. Nearly one-third of all women between 18-24 have experienced dating violence. This free pamphlet explains the warning signs and explains how to avoid escalating problems in a relationship. It can help you avoid dating violence or get out of an abusive relationship. Continue reading

Emergency Contraception & Sexual Assault: Why Compassionate Care Should be a Standard of Care

The Compassionate Assistance for Rape Emergencies (CARE) Act of 2009 (H.R.1236) and the Prevention First Act of 2009 (H.R.463/S.21) were introduced in Congress in early 2009. The sole purpose of the CARE Act, and one of several goals of the Prevention First Act, would be to direct hospitals and emergency medicine facilities that receive federal funding to inform all women who have been sexually assaulted about emergency contraception (also known as the “morning after pill” or “Plan B”) and to make it available to them, regardless of their ability to pay. Continue reading

Dating Violence: A Two Way Street, But Girls Are Hurt Most

Some people believe teenage relationships are superficial, short-lived, and insignificant. However, a growing field of research suggests that what happens in teenage relationships shape future relationships. Unfortunately teenage relationships can be violent, and both genders can commit acts of violence. As a result, preventative measures and education should be started in middle school and focus on both genders. Continue reading