5 Airplane Travel Health Tips

Natalie Rosseau 2016 Did you know that more than 230 million passengers are scheduled to fly on U.S. airlines this summer, setting a record high for summer air travel? If you or your loved ones are among them, here are … Continue reading

Health risks of not enough sleep: Why Z’s Matter!

Did you know that not getting enough sleep can cause health problems beyond just feeling tired and worn out? Recent studies have found that lack of adequate sleep is related to weight gain, sexual problems, reduced concentration, mental health problems, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

Good news for coffee drinkers: the health benefits outweigh the risks for most people

Recent research suggests that coffee offers more health benefits than risks for most people. However, women who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant and women over 65 should probably limit their coffee intake because for them, the risks may outweigh the benefits. Continue reading

The benefits of pets for human health

Animals play an important role in many people’s lives. In addition to seeing-eye dogs and dogs that can be trained to detect seizures, animals can also be used in occupational therapy, speech therapy, or physical rehabilitation to help patients recover. Aside from these designated therapeutic roles, animals are also valued as companions. Learn more about the possible benefits of that companionship. Continue reading

2016 Update: When should women start regular mammograms? 40? 50? And how often is “regular”?

In recent years, there has been a growing concern that annual mammograms starting at age 40 may do more harm than good for many women. That is why the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, an expert group that reviews the latest research findings, recommends that mammography screening for most women start at age 50 rather than 40, and that the frequency be every two years (instead of annually) through the age of 74. Continue reading

Health Insurance: It’s open enrollment season – now what?

Laurén A. Doamekpor 2015 In case you hadn’t noticed, open enrollment season is upon us! Open enrollment is the time every fall when you have the chance to either stick with your old health insurance plan or pick a new … Continue reading

Early morning classes, sleepy students, and risky behaviors

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, most schools started between 8:30-9:00 and many students barely stayed awake all day. Today, many high schools start at 7:30 or earlier, and a growing number of studies show that these early school schedules can undermine teenagers’ ability to learn, to drive safely, and to get along with others. They can even increase the likelihood of smoking, drug abuse, and teen pregnancy. Continue reading

Beginner’s guide to developing an exercise routine

Exercise is one of NCHR’s seven recommended ways to maximize your health. If you want to exercise but aren’t sure where to begin, we can help! If you feel like your daily life doesn’t allow you to get fit (not enough time, no money for a gym membership, etc.), we have some “work-arounds” that may help. Continue reading

Is when you eat just as important as what you eat?

Wouldn’t it be great if there was a simple way to lose weight? Instead of counting calories or cutting carbs, what if you could just avoid eating during certain times? A study in 2012 showed that mice who were restricted to only eating at regular times throughout an eight hour period weighed 28% less than mice who consumed the same number of calories but ate frequently throughout the entire day Continue reading

Benadryl and other common medications are linked to dementia in men and women

Many people turn to over-the-counter medicines when they need relief from allergy and cold symptoms or have trouble falling asleep. That’s why you might be concerned about a new study showing that one of the most common of those drugs—Benadryl—could lead to serious health problems, including dementia. Continue reading

A cure for peanut allergies?

Food allergies are on the rise, making school, traveling, and even birthday parties risky business for many children. However, there might be a cure: in a 2014 study of Oral Immunotherapy treatment (OIT), over 80% of participants were able to eat the equivalent of about five peanuts after OIT. Continue reading

Preventing hip fracture: do supplements help?

In 2012, calcium and vitamin D made headlines in the health world when many new studies on the effectiveness and safety of supplements were released. Read more about these nutrients and why you should or should not take supplements. Continue reading

Barefoot and minimalist running: what you need to know

Barefoot and minimalist running are the new crazes in the running world, but can you really run faster, longer, and with fewer injuries by shedding your shoes? Find out the benefits and risks of barefoot running to see if it is really a good option for your workout. Continue reading

6 things you need to know about juicing your veggies

There is no question that eating your vegetables is good for your health, but what about drinking them? Juicing vegetables is one of the latest health trends, so here’s what you need to know about adding fresh juices to your diet. Continue reading

Which medications, tests, and treatments should you really get? Recommendations for “Choosing Wisely”

When it comes to our health we often want to know as much as possible. But sometimes there is just too much information on what to do to stay healthy. Continue reading

How do you recover from rape?

After being sexually assaulted, it can be difficult to know where to turn for help. Several studies suggest that group therapy is more effective at reducing PTSD, anxiety, and depression than individual therapy. However, group therapy may not be the best choice for everyone. Find out what other forms of therapy are available so you can decide what is right for you or a loved one. Continue reading

Can taking fish oil supplements help lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy?

Fish oil is a well-known supplement that is said to have many benefits. Research shows that taking fish oil may help lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy respond better to treatment and reduce side effects of chemotherapy. Continue reading

Pancreatic cancer: could bacteria in our mouth help us detect this deadly cancer sooner?

Pancreatic cancer has an extremely low survival rate because it is difficult to detect at early stages. A method for earlier diagnosis would greatly improve patients’ chances of survival. New research suggests that a specific type of oral bacteria might serve as a warning sign for pancreatic cancer. Continue reading

Eating habits that improve health and lower body mass index

More and more research studies are confirming the importance of keeping body mass index (BMI) and waistline measurements under control in order to reduce the risk of disease and premature death. Keeping track of calories and fat percentages can be confusing, and the nutrition labels on the foods we buy aren’t always that helpful. How are consumers supposed to figure out which diet advice is just hype – that ultimately don’t contribute to better health – and which advice offers good, medically sound information? Continue reading